100+ Interesting Words You Should Slip Into Conversation To Sound Intelligent

You send dozens of texts and spend hours talking every single day — but you are reusing most of your words. You are repeating yourself without even realizing you are doing so. There are hundreds of interesting words that you have never even heard of before (or you might have already heard but have no idea how to use them in a sentence).

It’s time to learn something new, to broaden your vocabulary, to sound even more eloquent than you already are. If you can find a way to slip these words into everyday conversation, you are going to look like the most intelligent person in the room.

Aa — a kind of volcanic lava that forms jagged masses with a light frothy texture

Abibliophobia — afraid of running out of things to read

Aquiver — trembling

Aurora — dawn

Aplomb — self-confident

Acnestis — between the shoulder blades and the loins which an animal cannot reach to scratch

Apropos — appropriate

Atrate — dressed in black

Agelast — a person who never laughs

Agastopia — admiration of a particular part of someone else’s body

Bibliopole — a person who buys and sells books, especially rare ones

Biblioklept — a person who steals books

Bibble — eating or drinking noisily

Bloviate — people who talk for a long period of time

Balter — dance clumsily

Bedizen — dress gaudily

Bleb — a blister

Boondoggle — a waste of time and money

Burke — murder without leaving a trace on the body

Borborygm — hungry

Bumfuzzle —  confused, perplexed, or flustered

Bombinate — making a humming or buzzing noise

Bumbershoot — an umbrella

Cattywampus — in disarray

Collywobbles — a weird feeling in your stomach

Cahoots — secret partnership

Caruncle — the triangular, pink areas at the corner of your eyes

Churlish — rude

Compotation — a drinking party

Conspuer — to spit with contempt

Comeuppance — getting what you deserve

Cancatervate — heaping things into a pile

Cabotage — the exclusive right of a country to control the air traffic within its borders

Cromulent — appearing legitimate but actually being spurious

Donnybrook — an uprising, a melee, or a riot

Darkle — becoming cloudy or dark

Defenestration — the act of throwing someone out of a window

Denouement — the resolution of a narrative

Doodle sack — bag pipes

Duffifie — laying a bottle on its side for some time so that it may be completely drained of the few drops remaining

Draconian — unusually severe

Erinaceous — resembling a hedgehog

Ethereal — Extremely delicate, light, not of this world

Egress — an exit

Ennui — bordem

Erratum — an error in printing

Epistemology — the study of knowledge

Esoteric — knowledge that is only available to a select group of people

Elysian — blissful, delightful

Epoch — A particular period of time in history or a person’s life

Eurhythmic — an aesthetically pleasing rhythm or structure

Flibbertigibbet — silly and overly talkative

Foppish — foolish, silly, obsolete

Fugacious — fleeting or transient

Fillip — snapping your fingers

Gubbins — an object that has little or no value

Grawlix — a series of symbols commonly used in comics or cartoons to represent curse words

Grommet — an eyelet of firm material to strengthen or protect an opening or to insulate or protect something passed through it

Hubris — excessive presumption, exaggerated pride or self-confidence

Halfpace — a platform of a staircase where the stair turns back in exactly the reverse direction of the lower flight

Hiraeth — A homesickness for a home you can’t return to, or that never was

Impignorate — pawning something

Interrobang — a punctuation mark designed for use especially at the end of an exclamatory rhetorical question; usually written as ?!

Interfenestration — the space between two windows

Ineffable — Too great to be expressed in words

Jentacular — pertaining to breakfast

Jalopy — an old, decrepit, or unpretentious automobile

Kyphorrhinos — a nose with a bump in it

Lollygag — wasting time

Lamprophony — loudness and clarity of enunciation

Limerence — being infatuated with another person

Logophile — lover of words

Lothario — a man whose chief interest is seducing women

Malarkey — insincere, foolish talk

Macrosmatic — having a good sense of smell

Meldrop — a drop of mucus at the nose, whether produced by cold or otherwise

Metanoia — a spiritual transformation

Meme — an idea, behavior, style, or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture

Nincompoop — an idiot

Nibling — the gender-neutral term for nieces or nephews

Nefarious — Wicked, villainous, despicable

Numinous — spiritual, supernatural

Nudiustertian — the day before yesterday

Oblivion — the state of being unaware of what is happening around you

Octothorpe  — the hashtag symbol

Obelus — the division symbol

Oxter — armpit

Pandiculation — yawning and stretching

Pauciloquent — someone who doesn’t say much

Pilgarlic — a bald head

Phosphenes — the light and colors produced by rubbing your eyes

Petrichor — The pleasant, earthy smell after rain

Preantepenultimate — fourth from last

Paresthesia — the prickly feeling when your limb “falls asleep.”

Poobah — a powerful person.

Pogonotrophy — growing and grooming a beard or other facial hair

Rasher — a thin slice of bacon

Taradiddle — filled with pretentious nonsense

Tergiversate — to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a caus

Snickersnee — a long, dangerous knife

Salopettes — high-waisted skiing pants with shoulder straps

Supine — Lying face upwards

Sonder — the realization that each passerby has a life as vivid and complex as your own

Schadenfreude — experiencing pleasure or satisfaction from the trouble, failure or humiliation of others

Somnambulist — A person who sleepwalks

Serendipity — The chance occurrence of events in a beneficial way

Snollygoster — a politician who does or says things for their own personal advancement

Snellen chart — the standard eye exam chart.

Scintillate — emitting sparks

Syzygy — an alignment of celestial bodies

Tittynope — a small quantity of something left over

Ulotrichous — having wooly or crispy hair

Quire — two dozen sheets of paper

Quixotic — unrealistically optimistic

Valetudinarian — a sickly or weak person, especially one who is constantly and morbidly concerned with his or her health

Vellichor — the strange wistfulness of used bookshops

Wabbit — exhausted

Widdershins — moving counter-clockwise

Winklepicker — a shoe with a long pointed toe

Yarborough — when the dealer deals a hand without any numbers above nine

Xertz — eating food quickly and/or greedily

Zoanthropy — a person who has delusions that they are a form of animal  TC mark

Source : https://thoughtcatalog.com/january-nelson/2018/06/interesting-words/

Kanye West Tweeted About Deadpool And Ryan Reynolds Actually Responded

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Not everyone is as in love with Deadpool as the Internet make it seem. The character’s films are often violent, have an off-color sense of humor, and not everybody wants to listen to Ryan Reynolds crack wise for two hours. But there’s one thing most of us can agree on.

The music for Deadpool 2 bangs:

Ryan Reynolds agrees, of course:

Apparently, so does another person who knows a thing or two about music. Kanye West is a big fan.

West tweeted about the Deadpool soundtrack, implying he would have been thrilled to collaborate with Dion and the rest:

He also kind of seems to be implying they ripped him off instead of asking him to do it? Okaaayyyyy.

If it happened, this could be a controversial partnering, since Kanye West has lately been developing a reputation for himself as a Trump supporter and a man with some wild ideas about slavery, mental health, and all sorts of topics that get people pretty upset.

It’s been a huge mess, and he’s dragged all his friends into it, even Chrissy Teigen and John Legend, posting the latter’s texts on Twitter.

But, it doesn’t seem like Reynolds cares? About any of it? Because he down to include Mr. West on Deadpool 3.

He looped in Celine, and she seems to be cool with it, too:

Now, Buzzfeed seems to think that Reynolds is trolling Kanye and this match up will never, ever happen.

They brought up that Reynolds and his wife Blake Lively are very good friends with Taylor Swift, and the character of Deadpool even wore a shirt in the movie featuring Swift’s two kitty cats. She even thanked him for it on Instagram:

Taylor Swift and West have been in a notorious feud for some time (though he seems to have other things on his mind now). Swift even shaped her latest album around the altercation she had with West and Kim Kardashian, during which Kardashian used a snake emoji to symbolize Taylor in a leaked video that caught her in a lie. Hissss!

So, it’s possible that Reynolds is just kidding and would never work with West in a million years. But one important thing about celebrities, is they’ll do anything to keep their fame going. 

And it seems like fans are very into the idea:

But other people are also convinced that both Reynolds and Dion are kidding:

I guess we’ll have to wait and see what happens in Deadpool 3. Maybe by then, West’s reputation will be rehabilitated. In which case, Reynolds’ response works just as well, doesn’t it? Hmm.

Source : https://www.distractify.com/trending/2018/06/13/ZFdPDy/ryan-reynolds-kanye-west-deadpool

The 50+ Worst Baby Names That Actually Appeared On Birth Certificates

Please don’t use any of these actual baby names for your own kid. These are the worst baby names ever given to a living, breathing, defenseless baby human.

Naming a child is arguably one of the most important decisions a couple makes after bringing forth a new life into this world. That name doesn’t go away—ever (unless of course you change it through a very tedious legal process that barely anyone ever bothers with). The fact is that your name ends up sticking with you for always. So parents beware! Don’t try to be too clever, or too unique when selecting a name for your kid. Look through this list of the all-time worst baby names for a reminder of what NOT to do when choosing a moniker for another human

1. Ajax

2. Ahmiracle

3. I’munique

4. Elizabreth

5. Aliviyah

6. Nevaeh

7. Beberly

8. Sweetheart

9. Abcde

10. Merica

11. Jerica

12. Devil

13. Kaizyle

14. Orgasm

15. North West

16. Appaloosa

17. Panthy

18. Reighleigh

19. Star

20. Vejonica

21. Heaven Lee

22. L’Oreal

23. Derfla

24. Phelony

25. Tu Morrow

26. Moxie

27. Abstinence

28. Fifi

29. Trixie

30. Apple

31. Facebook

32. Olive Garden

33. Jihad

34. Clitis

35. Colon

36. Zuma

37. Herpe

38. Yunique

39. Gotham

40. Inspektor

41. Jammy

42. Like

43. Mazen

44. Sssst

45. Rage

46. Billion

47. Princecharles

48. Audio

49. Sadman

50. Seven

51. Obamanique

52. Hashtag

53. Lucifer

54. Hitler

55. Fetus

56. C’kret

57. Germ

58. Thorn TC mark

Source : https://thoughtcatalog.com/january-nelson/2018/06/worst-baby-names/

People Are Photoshopping This Guy's Honeymoon Photo For Our Amusement

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The holding someone’s hand as they take a picture of you heading off into the unknown is a bit of a cliche. It’s also still cute, so I get why people do it, especially couples. You’re going through life with your partner, striking off on adventures, always hand in hand. It’s romantic! Or it is until someone destroys it.

YouTube star Jack Douglass recently married his wife, Erin, and naturally, he decided to share some a photo exactly as described above with the Internet. But he added a twist: he asked his followers to Photoshop Erin running into God knows what, even providing a .png to make it that much easier.

This is how the photo actually looks, and to be honest, it already seems too perfect to be real.

Anyway, you know what happens when you give the Internet an easy Photoshop opportunity.

Someone will splinter your reality:

Even though our actual reality is disturbing enough:

So bad, in fact, that this looks comparatively positive:

Even the Emoji movie is better, though not a great honeymoon:

Some people got very carried away by the project:

Though others were more honest about their limitations:

Some of the new honeymoon destinations were nice, though very specific:

But most were kind of a hellscape. A Jake Paul event? Grounds for divorce.

Which someone else pushed them towards immediately:

Nice.

There were also zombies:

A Bieber hit:

And a trip to the International House of Burgers:

Where would you drag your new husband to? I think I’d go to IHOb, because I am really curious about how things are going over there.

Source : https://www.distractify.com/relationships/2018/06/13/BFi6G/photoshopping-honeymoon-photo-

250+ Ancient Mythology Names That Sound Modern

Mythological stories are fascinating. They are filled with intense adventures, unbelievable conquests, and strong characters. In order to honor these stories that have been passed down for hundreds of years, you should think about naming your child (or your character in a video game) after one of them.

Here are some of the most underrated mythology names that still sound beautiful, even to this day:

Aphrodite

Athena

Agave

Apollo

Adrastos

Aeolus

Astraea

Aeson

Aja

Anat

Artemis

Anthea

Agamemnon

Acantha

Adrasteia

Arjun

Aditya

Andreas

Aidan

Alcippe

Atlas

Achilles

Argus

Aristaeus

Andromeda

Angus

Anubis

Ares

Arthur

Atlas

Ammon

Adonis

Ajax

Athena

Althea

Amy

Anahi

Anemone

Aria

Arianna

Aubrey

Anne

Argos

Ares

Aurora

Bia

Bacchus

Bridget

Balder

Bellona

Beowulf

Basil

Briseis

Brontes

Callistro

Camilla

Carman

Ceres

Corbin

Cael

Conner

Cressida

Cephalus

Calliope

Clio

Celeste

Cynthia

Claudia

Chloe

Cepheus

Cerberus

Cassandra

Chryses

Charon

Calypso

Castor

Chloris

Damon

Daedalus

Danae

Demeter

Dana

Danica

Danna

Deirdre

Destiny

Demi

Delia

Demetra

Dion

Dillion

Diana

Diane

Doris

Demetrius

Daphne

Damon

Davy

Dylan

Damocles

Dardanos

Dionysius

Eros

Eurydice

Europa

Elaine

Echo

Eudora

Eva

Evadne

Erato

Euphrosyne

Evander

Elvis

Felicity

Finola

Fiona

Flora

Finn

Freya

Freyja

Glaucus

Gaia

Grace

Gawain

Gerd

Grendel

Griffin

Gunner

Gunnar

Guinevere

Gwenn

Hector

Helen

Homer

Hera

Hecate

Hestia

Hippolyta

Harmonia

Harmony

Hero

Hebe

Helios

Iris

Isis

Irene

Isadora

Ithica

Isolde

Iacchus

Ianthe

Jason

Justin

Julian

Julia

Julius

Juno

Jocasta

Kreios

Kyron

Kali

Kalliope

Kai

Kana

Kallisto

Koios

Leander

Lance

Linus

Loki

Lachesis

Leda

Leto

Lilith

Lorelei

Larisa

Lycus

Melanthios

Medea

Morpheus

Maddox

Melaina

Maximus

Mark

Marcus

Melete

Mars

Merlin

Marian

Morgan

Makena

Maya

Melanie

Melissa

Neoptolemus

Nyx

Nia

Niamh

Nero

Nanna

Okeanos

Olwen

Owen

Ovid

Orion

Oya

Odin

Osiris

Phoebe

Phoenix

Paris

Pax

Paul

Priam

Pollux

Persephone

Penelope

Phaedra

Phaenna

Pistis

Phyllis

Perseus

Poseidon

Proteus

Rhea

Rhiannon

Robin

Radha

Rhianna

Sabrina

Soroya

Selene

Sif

Sheila

Sylvia

Semele

Triton

Tom

Thor

Tristan

Troilus

Tyr

Troy

Theia

Tisiphone

Thalia

Tethys

Terpsichore

Theseus

Thanatos

Ulysses

Vesta

Vivian

Wak

Wieland

Waylon

Xana

Yaritza

Zaria

Zeus

Zephyr TC mark

Source : https://thoughtcatalog.com/january-nelson/2018/06/mythology-names/

These Foods Are Banned In Different Countries, Some For Strange Reasons

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One of the most annoying/enjoyable parts about being human is that you have to/get to eat and drink stuff.

Personally, I wish we were like robots and never had to waste our time meal-prepping or going out to eat and just doing all sorts of other things that don’t involve masticating and worry about what I’m putting inside my body. But I can’t think about that too much or my head will explode. I’m stuck being a human and all of the trappings that come alone with it.

Since your diet has a huge impact on your overall health, then it makes sense that a lot of governments are making sure that food companies aren’t cutting corners and putting out harmful products that are ultimately going to give its citizens a bunch of nasty diseases in the name of short-term profits. It’s a big reason the FDA was founded in America back in the day – because people were being sold nasty meat and milk. It wasn’t a pretty time for our nation.

But there are various reasons some foods are banned in countries – some of them have to do with cultural and legal reasons more than health issues.

This specific kind of Kinder Surprise Egg, in the US, for example, is banned for posing a choking hazard to children.

The hollowed chocolate egg with the toy inside can’t be sold stateside. That doesn’t mean there aren’t some Kinder treat-toy combos sold in America. My son is particularly fond of the nutella, split-eggs that still pack a toy. It’s not the same, but he still loves them.

If you’re a fan of foie gras and are hoping to get the delicacy in California, well, you’re out of luck.

In order to get a duck’s liver extra fatty, the farm-raised mallards have feeding tubes jammed down their throats, forcing them to eat so their livers get nice and plump. The inhumane treatment of the animals rubs not only the Golden State the wrong way, but Italy, India, Denmark, Finland, Poland, Germany, Norway, and Israel as well – they’ve all banned the sale of foie gras.

If you love chewing gum, then you’re going to have to kick the habit when you’re in Singapore.

The country prides itself on staying clean, and you can’t accomplish that with a bunch of nasty gum chewers spitting their wads on the street. If you’re a bodega owner caught selling the stuff, you’ll get fined $1,000. That’s a lot of Fruit Stripe.

Ketchup is severely restricted in France.

French cuisine is all about the sauce, and since the country is pretty much known as the gastronomical capital of the world, it only makes sense that they’d want to preserve the integrity of their amazing sauces. Which means that ketchup can’t just be slathered on anything. School children, for example, can only have french fries served with ketchup once a week, but don’t expect to find the condiment on anything else.

M&Ms aren’t welcome in Sweden.

The chocolate-coated confection is too similar to another “M” candy that’s been manufactured in Sweden since 1957. Because the M&M’s name is too similar to the “M” brand, Mondelez objected to the sale of them in the country – they pleaded their case and won.

Fugu blowfish is illegal to eat in the United States due to its toxic nature.

Only specially licensed chefs are allowed to the serve the delicacy as parts of the pufferfish contain tetrodotoxin, which is 1,200 times more deadly than cyanide. You’ll die rather quickly if you accidentally ingest it, so it makes sense that you’d want someone who knows exactly what they’re doing before serving it to you.

Haggis might be a Scottish delicacy, but in the US, it’s been illegal to serve since 1971.

The department of agriculture ruled against eating a livestock’s lungs, which is a key ingredient in the Scotch delicacy, along with a sheep’s heart and liver.

OG Four Loko.

It turns out the original formula of Four Loko packed too much alcohol and caffeine into the same package, making it an amazing party drink, but also, a dangerous amalgamation that made getting alcohol-poisoning super easy. It’s still available today, but with a modified ingredients list.

Raw milk is a no-no in America.

If dairy isn’t pasteurized in America, retailers and restaurants can’t sell it because the risk of illness is too high. That doesn’t stop people from drinking it straight from the tap themselves, however.

Sea bass, Celtic cod, and Irish sole is being fished to near-extinction in Great Britain.

As a result, there’s been a proposal to ban the sale of the fish in restaurants in the British empire.

Farm-raised salmon cannot be sold in Australia and New Zealand.

The Environmental Defense fund has listed a number of concerns regarding the sale and growth of “Atlantic Salmon”, which is just a euphemism for the farm-raised variety of the species.

Beluga caviar cannot be sold in the United States legally.

Beluga caviar’s been illegal stateside since 2005 in an effort to help protect the sturgeon population.

Sassafras oil is carcinogenic, and it used to be a prime ingredient in root beer floats.

The oil was discovered to cause kidney and liver damage and it also has hallucinogenic properties similar to MDMA. They’re not used in floats today, although drinking one and going on a roll sounds like an amazing way to spend a Saturday night, minus the organ failure.

Shark Fin soup because it’s disgustingly inhumane.

California banned the sale of Shark-Fin soup because of the way the fins are harvested: sharks are hunted and killed, have their fins lopped off, and their bodies are thrown into the ocean, alive. They die slow, agonizing deaths. The rest of the country is expected to outlaw this practice along with the state of California.

The rBGH hormone is linked to increased risks of cow disease.

The hormone was designed to help cows produce more milk, but not without some side effects. Cows treated with the hormone were discovered to have a higher resistance to anti-biotics, making them more likely to becomes diseased. Meaning the milk one drinks from them could be rife with bacteria that you wouldn’t want to imbibe. Israel, the European Union, and Canada have all banned the use of rBGH in its livestock.

What are some other “banned” foods that are missing from this list that struck you as odd?

Source : https://www.distractify.com/trending/2018/06/13/Zt0YKR/food-countries-banned

200+ French Last Names For Your Inner Francophile

If you’re looking to change your name because you’re aching to add a dash of something special to your personal aura, these French last names will help you do that. They’re also quite helpful for naming that French character in your next great screenplay or novel.

ABEL

ABRAHAM

ADAM

ALBERT

ALLARD

ANDRÉ

ARCHAMBAULT

ARTHUR

AUGUSTIN

BABIN

BABINEAUX

BARRE

BAUDIN

BEAUCHÊNE

BEAUFORT

BEAULIEU

BEAUMONT

BÉLANGER

BELLAMY

BELLEROSE

BELMONT

BELROSE

BÉRANGER

BERGER

BÉRINGER

BERNARD

BERTRAND

BLAISE

BLANC

BLANCHAR

BLANCHET

BLANCHETT

BOIVIN

BONFILS

BONHEUR

BONHOMME

BONNAIRE

BONNAY

BONNET

BORDE

BOUCHARD

BOUCHER

BOURDILLON

BOURREAU

BRET

BRISBOIS

BRODEUR

BUREAU

CARON

CHAPUT

CHARBONNEAU

CHARPENTIER

CHARRON

CHASTAIN

CHEVALIER

CHEVROLET

CHRISTIAN

CLÉMENT

CLOUTIER

COLBERT

COMTOIS

COSTE

CÔTÉ

COURTEMANCHE

COUSINEAU

COUTURE

DANIAU

DANIEL

D’ARAMITZ

DAVIAU

DAVID

DEFOREST

DEGARMO

DELACROIX

DE LA FONTAINE

DENIAU

DENIAUD

DENIEL

DENIS

DENNEL

DESCHAMPS

DESCOTEAUX

DESJARDINS

DESROCHES

DESROSIERS

DROIT

DUBOIS

DUCHAMPS

DUFORT

DUFOUR

DUGUAY

DUMONT

DUPOND

DUPONT

DURAND

DURANT

DUVAL

ÉMILE

FABIEN

FABRE

FABRON

FAUCHER

FAUCHEUX

FAURE

FAVAGER

FAVRE

FAVREAU

FAY

FÉLIX

FÈVRE

FIRMIN

FONTAINE

FOREST

FORESTIER

FORTIER

FOSSE

FOURNIER

FRANÇOIS

GAGE

GAGNEUX

GAGNIER

GAGNON

GARÇON

GARDINIER

GARNIER

GAUTHIER

GERMAIN

GÉROUX

GIRARD

GIROUX

GOSSE

GOSSELIN

GRANGER

GROS

GUÉRIN

GUILLORY

HARDY

HÉBERT

HERBERT

JACQUES

JANVIER

JORDAN

JOUBERT

LABELLE

LACHANCE

LACHAPELLE

LAMAR

LAMBERT

LANE

LANGLAIS

LANGLOIS

LAPOINTE

LARUE

LAURENT

LAVIGNE

LAVOIE

LEANDRES

LEBEAU

LEBLANC

LECLAIR

LECLERC

LÉCUYER

LEFEBVRE

LEFÈVRE

LEFURGEY

LEGRAND

LEMAIRE

LÉMIEUX

LEON

LEROY

LESAUVAGE

LESTRANGE

LÉVÊQUE

LÉVESQUE

LINVILLE

LUCAS

LYON

MAÇON

MARCHAND

MARIE

MARION

MARTEL

MARTEL

MARTIN

MASSON

MASSON

MATHIEU

MERCIER

MERLE

MICHAUD

MICHEL

MONET

MONETTE

MONTAGNE

MOREAU

MOREL

MOULIN

MULLINS

NICOLAS

NOEL

NOYER

OLIVIER

PAGET

PALOMER

PAN

PAPE

PAQUET

PAQUET

PARENT

PARIS

PARRIS

PASCAL

PATENAUDE

PATERNOSTER

PAUL

PELLETIER

PERRAULT

PERREAULT

PERRIN

PERROT

PETIT

PETTIGREW

PIERRE

PLAMONDON

PLOURDE

POIRIER

PORCHER

POULIN

PROULX

RENAUD

REY

REYER

RICHARD

RICHELIEU

ROBERT

ROCHE

ROME

ROMILLY

ROSE

ROUSSEAU

ROUSSEL

ROUX

ROY

ROYER

SALMON

SALOMON

SAMSON

SAMUEL

SARTRE

SAULT

SAUVAGE

SAUVAGEAU

SAUVAGEON

SAUVAGEOT

SAUVETERRE

SAVATIER

SEGAL

SERGEANT

SÉVERIN

SIMON

SOUCY

SOURD

ST MARTIN

ST PIERRE

TAILLER

TASSE

THAYER

THIBAULT

THOMAS

TRAVER

TRAVERE

TRAVERS

TRAVERSE

TRAVERT

TREMBLAY

TREMBLE

VICTOR

VILLENEUVE

VINCENT

VOCLAIN TC mark

Source : http://thoughtcatalog.com/january-nelson/2018/06/french-last-names/

100+ Flower Names For Beautiful Baby Girls

You should give your baby girl a name as beautiful as a flower so she will blossom into a strong young woman. She is going to have the same name for all of her life, so you should make sure you pick something fitting. Something that perfectly describes the person you hope she grows into.

Since there is nothing more beautiful than a flower, here are some of the most adorable flower names that make for perfect baby names (but won’t sound strange once she grows a little older either):

Anemone

Amaryllis

Angelica

Aster

Azalea

Apple

Azami

Blossom

Briar

Begonia

Belladonna

Bluebell

Bryony

Buttercup

Bergamot

Calytrix

Cassia

Cynthia

Clover

Carnation

Cherry

Canterbury

Cardinal

Celosia

Chives

Chrysantemum

Calla

Camellia

Cinnamon

Daphne

Dahlia

Daisy

Daffodil

Delphine

Elestren

Evergreen

Fennel

Fern

Flora

Freesia

Forsythia

Gladiolus

Geranium

Gazania

Holly

Heliotrope

Hyacinth

Hibiscus

Heather

Hazel

Hosta

Iris

Ivy

Ianthe

Indigo

Jasmine

Jonquil

Jessamine

Kalina

Kantuta

Lillian

Lily

Lemon

Lilac

Lavender

Lotus

Leilani

Magnolia

Marjoram

Marguerite

Mimosa

Malva

Marigold

Myrtle

Narcissus

Olive

Orchid

Petal

Peony

Posey

Petunia

Pasque

Periwinkle

Pansy

Poppy

Primrose

Rosy

Rue

Rosa

Rose

Rosemary

Senna

Sage

Tulip

Thyme

Yasmin

Violet

Viola

Verbena

Willow

Wisteria

Xochitl

Zinnia TC mark

Source : https://thoughtcatalog.com/january-nelson/2018/06/flower-names/

350+ Unique Words You Can Use To Impress People

Review this list of unique words if you want to sound super educated and impress your friends with your fancy language skills. No matter how learned you are, you’ll find dozens of words below that you’ve never EVER heard of. Add them to your vocabulary or just skim for fun.

Abaya — a full-length, sleeveless outer garment worn by Arabs

Abomasum — the fourth stomach of a ruminant, such as a cow or sheep

Absquatulate — to leave somewhere abruptly

Adscititious — additional

Afreet — a powerful jinn or demon in Arabian and Muslim mythology

Albertopolis — a group of museums and other cultural institutions in South Kensington in London, named after Prince Albert

Unique Words

Alcazar — a Spanish palace or fortress

Amphibology — a phrase or sentence that is grammatically ambiguous, such asShe sees more of her children than her husband

Amphisbaena — a mythical serpent with a head at each end

Anfractuous — winding or circuitous

Anguilliform — resembling an eel

Apoptosis — the death of cells which occurs as a normal part of an organism’s growth or development

Apple-knocker — informal an ignorant or unsophisticated person

Argle-bargle — copious but meaningless talk or writing

Argus-eyed — vigilant, referring to Argos, a Greek mythological watchman with a hundred eyes

Argute — shrewd

Aspergillum — an implement used for sprinkling holy water in religious ceremonies

Astrobleme — an eroded remnant of a large, ancient crater made by the impact of a meteorite or comet

Attic salt — refined, incisive wit

Autotomy — the casting off of a limb or other part of the body by an animal under threat, such as a lizard

Badmash — a hooligan

Bandoline — a sticky preparation used for setting hair

Unique Words

Bardolatry — humorous excessive admiration of Shakespeare

Barmecide — illusory or imaginary and therefore disappointing

Barn burner — a very exciting or dramatic event, especially a sports contest; first used of an exceptionally good hand at bridge

Bashment — a large party or dance

Bawbee — Scottish a coin of low value

Benthos — the flora and fauna on the bottom of a sea or lake

Bergschrund — a type of crevasse

Bezoar — a small hard, solid mass which may form in the stomachs of animals such as goats or sheep

Bibliopole — a person who buys and sells books, especially rare ones

Bilboes — an iron bar with sliding shackles, used to fasten prisoners’ ankles

Bindlestiff — a tramp

Bingle — informal a collision

Blatherskite — a person who talks at great length without making much sense

Bleeding edge — the very forefront of technological development

Blind pig — informal a place where alcoholic drinks are sold illegally

Bobsy-die — a great deal of fuss or trouble

Boffola — informal a joke that gets a loud or hearty laugh

Boilover — informal a surprise result in a sporting event

Borborygmus — a rumbling or gurgling noise in the intestines

Breatharian — a person who believes that it is possible, through meditation, to reach a level of consciousness where one can exist on air alone

Brobdingnagian — gigantic, from Brobdingnag, a country in Jonathan Swift’sGulliver’s Travels

Bruxism — involuntary and habitual grinding of the teeth

Bumbo — a drink of rum, sugar, water, and nutmeg

Burnsides — a mustache in combination with whiskers on the cheeks but no beard on the chin

Cacoethes — an urge to do something inadvisable

Callipygian — having shapely buttocks

Callithumpian — like a discordant band or a noisy parade

Camisado — a military attack carried out at night

Canorous — melodious or resonant

Cantillate — to chant or intone a passage of religious text

Unique Words

Carphology — convulsive or involuntary movements made by delirious patients, such as plucking at the bedclothes

Catoptromancy — foretelling the future by means of a mirror

Cereology — the study or investigation of crop circles

Cerulean — deep sky blue

Chad — a piece of waste paper produced by punching a hole

Chalkdown — informal a teachers’ strike

Chanticleer — a rooster in a fairy tale

Chiliad — a thousand things or a thousand years

Claggy — ialect sticky or able to form sticky lumps

Clepsydra — an early clock using the flow of water into or out of a container

Colporteur — a person who peddles books, newspapers, or other writings, especially bibles and religious tracts

Comess — a confused or noisy situation

Commensalism — an association between two organisms in which one benefits from the relationship and the other derives neither harm nor benefit

Comminatory — threatening, punitive, or vengeful

Concinnity — elegance or neatness of literary or artistic style

Congius — an ancient Roman liquid measure equal in modern terms to about 6 imperial pints

Conniption (or conniption fit) — informal a fit of rage or hysterics

Constellate — to gather together in a cluster or group

Coprolalia — the involuntary repetitive use of obscene language

Coriaceous — like leather

Couthy — Scottish (of a person) warm and friendly; (of a place) cosy and comfortable

Criticaster — a minor or incompetent critic

Crore — ten million

Crottle — a lichen used in Scotland to make a brownish dye for wool

Croze — a groove at the end of a cask or barrel in which the head is fixed

Cryptozoology — the search for and study of animals whose existence is unproven, such as the Loch Ness monster and the yeti

Cudbear — a purple or violet powder used for dyeing, made from lichen

Cupreous — of or like copper

Cyanic — blue; azure

Cybersquatting — the practice of registering well-known names as Internet domain names, in the hope of reselling them at a profit

Dariole — a small round metal mould used in French cooking for an individual sweet or savory dish

Deasil — clockwise or in the direction of the sun’s course

Decubitus — the posture of someone who is lying down or lying in bed

Deedy — industrious or effective

Defervescence — the lessening of a fever

Deglutition — the action or process of swallowing

Degust — to taste food or drink carefully, so as to fully appreciate it

Deipnosophist — a person skilled in the art of dining and dinner-table conversation

Deracinate — to tear something up by the roots

Deterge — to cleanse something thoroughly

Didi — an older sister or female cousin

Digerati — people with expertise or professional involvement in information technology

Dight — clothed or equipped; also, to make something ready for use

Discobolus — a discus thrower in ancient Greece

Disembogue — to emerge or pour out (used of a river or stream)

Disenthral — to set someone free from enslavement

Divagate — to stray or digress

Divaricate — to stretch or spread apart

Donkey engine — a small auxiliary engine on a ship

Donkeyman — a man working in a ship’s engine room

Doryphore — a pedantic and annoyingly persistent critic of others

Dotish — stupid or silly

Douceur — a financial inducement or bribe

Draff — dregs or refuse

Dragoman — an interpreter or professional guide for travellers, especially one in countries in which Arabic, Turkish, or Persian is spoken

Dumbsize — to reduce the staff numbers of a company to such low levels that work can no longer be carried out effectively

Dwaal — a dreamy, dazed, or absent-minded state

Ecdysiast — a striptease performer

Edacious — having to do with eating or fond of eating

Effable — able to be described in words.

Emacity — fondness for buying things

Emmetropia — the normal condition of the eye: perfect vision

Empasm — a perfumed powder sprinkled on the body to prevent sweating or for medicinal purposes

Ensorcell — to enchant or fascinate someone

Entomophagy — the eating of insects, especially by people

Erf — a plot of land

Ergometer — an apparatus which measures energy expended during physical exercise

Erubescent — reddening or blushing

E-tailer — a retailer who sells goods on the Internet

Etui — a small ornamental case for holding needles, cosmetics, and other articles

Eucatastrophe — a happy ending to a story

Eurhythmic — in harmonious proportion

Eviternity — eternal existence or everlasting duration

Exequies — funeral rites

Exsanguine — bloodless or anaemic

Extramundane — outside or beyond the physical world

Eyewater — W. Indian tears

Famulus — an assistant or attendant, especially one working for a magician or scholar

Fankle — Scottish to tangle or entangle something

Fipple — the mouthpiece of a recorder or similar wind instrument

Flatline — to die

Flews — the thick pendulous lips of a bloodhound or similar dog

Floccinaucinihilipilification — the action or habit of estimating something as worthless (a word generally only quoted as a curiosity)

Flocculent — having or resembling tufts of wool

Force-ripe — West Indian old or mature in certain respects without having developed fully in others

Forehanded — prudent or thrifty

Frondeur — a political rebel

Fugacious — transient or fleeting

Funambulist — a tightrope walker

Furuncle — a boil

Fuscous — dark and sombre in colour

Futhark — the Scandinavian runic alphabet

Futz — to waste time or busy oneself aimlessly

Gaberlunzie — archaic a beggar

Gaita — a kind of bagpipe played in northern Spain and Portugal

Galligaskins — a type of loose breeches worn in the 16th and 17th centuries

Gallus — Scottish bold or daring

Gasconade — extravagant boasting

Glabrous — (of skin) hairless or (of a leaf) having no down

Glaikit — foolish, or thoughtless

Gnathic — having to do with the jaws

Gobemouche — a gullible or credulous listener

Goodfella — a gangster, especially a member of a Mafia family

Guddle — Scottish to fish with one’s hands by groping under the stones or banks of a stream

Habile — deft or skilful

Hallux — Anatomy the big toe

Haruspex — a religious official in ancient Rome who inspected the entrails of sacrificial animals in order to foretell the future

Higgler — a person who travels from place to place selling small items

Hinky — US informal dishonest, suspect, or unreliable

Hoddy-noddy — a foolish person

Hodiernal — of today

Hoggin — a mixture of sand and gravel, used especially in road-building

Hongi — a traditional Maori greeting or salutation made by pressing or touching noses

Howff — a favourite meeting place or haunt, especially a pub

Humdudgeon — an imaginary illness

Hunt-and-peck — using only one or two fingers on a computer keyboard

Hwyl — a stirring feeling of emotional motivation and energy which is associated with the Welsh people

Illywhacker — informal a small-time confidence trickster

Incrassate — thickened in form or consistency

Incunabula — books printed before 1501

Ingurgitate — to swallow something greedily

Inspissate — to thicken or congeal

Inunct — to apply ointment to someone or something

Jumbuck — Austral. informal a sheep

Jumentous — resembling horse’s urine

Jungli — Indian uncultured or wild

Karateka — a person who performs karate

Keek — to peep surreptitiously

Kenspeckle — conspicuous or easily recognizable

Kinnikinnick — a substance consisting of dried sumac leaves and willow or dogwood bark, smoked by North American Indians

Labarum — a banner or flag bearing symbolic motifs

Lactarium — a dairy

Liripipe — the long dangling tail of a medieval academic hood

Loblolly — a North American pine tree with very long slender needles

Lobola — among southern African peoples, the money or cattle given by a bridegroom’s family to the bride’s family

Logomachy — an argument about words

Lollygag — to spend time in an aimless or lazy way

Luculent — (of speech or writing) clearly expressed

Lycanthropy — the supernatural transformation of a person into a wolf

Macushla — an affectionate form of address

Mallam — a learned man or scribe in Nigeria and other parts of Africa

Mamaguy — to try to deceive someone by flattering them or telling them lies

Martlet — a small, swallow-like bird with tufts of feathers in place of legs and feet

Mazel tov — a Jewish expression used to congratulate someone or wish them good luck

Meacock — a coward or effeminate person

Merkin — an artificial covering of hair for the pubic area

Merrythought — a bird’s wishbone

Mim — modest or demure in an affected or priggish way

Mimsy — rather feeble and prim or over-restrained (coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking Glass)

Minacious — menacing or threatening

Minibeast — informal a small invertebrate animal such as an insect or spider

Misogamy — the hatred of marriage

Mistigris — a joker or other extra card played as a wild card in some versions of poker

Mixologist — informal a person who is skilled at mixing cocktails and other drinks

Mollitious — luxurious or sensuous

Momism — excessive attachment to or domination by one’s mother

Monkey’s wedding — simultaneous rain and sunshine

Monorchid — having only one testicle

Moonraker — a native of the county of Wiltshire

Mouse potato — a person who spends large amounts of their leisure or working time on a computer

Mudlark — a person who scavenges in riverside mud at low tide for anything of value

Muktuk — the skin and blubber of a whale, eaten by the Inuit people

Mumpsimus — a traditional custom or notion that is adhered to although it has been shown to be unreasonable

Nacarat — a bright orange-red colour

Nagware — computer software which is free for a trial period and thereafter frequently reminds the user to pay for it

Nainsook — a fine, soft cotton fabric, originally made in the Indian subcontinent

Natation — swimming

Nesh — dialect weak, delicate, or feeble

Netizen — a habitual or keen user of the Internet

Noctambulist — a sleepwalker

Noyade — an execution carried out by drowning

Nugacity — triviality or frivolity

Nympholepsy — passion or rapture aroused in men by beautiful young girls

Obnubilate — to darken, dim, or obscure something

Ogdoad — a group or set of eight

Omophagy — the eating of raw food, especially meat

Omphalos — the centre or hub of something

Onolatry — the worship of donkeys or asses

Operose — involving or displaying a lot of effort

Opsimath — a person who begins to learn or study late in life

Orectic — having to do with desire or appetite

Orrery — a clockwork model of the solar system, or the sun, earth, and moon

Ortanique — a cross between an orange and a tangerine

Otalgia — earache

Oxter — a person’s armpit

Paludal — living or occurring in a marshy habitat

Pantagruelian — enormous

Panurgic — able or ready to do anything

Parapente — an aerofoil parachute, used for gliding

Paraph — a flourish after a signature

Patulous — (of the boughs of a tree, for example) spreading

Pavonine — to do with or resembling a peacock

Pedicular — to do with lice

Peely-wally — looking pale and unwell

Peever — hopscotch

Periapt — an item worn as a charm or amulet

Petcock — a small valve in a steam engine or boiler, used for drainage or for reducing pressure

Peterman — a person who breaks open and robs safes

Pettitoes — pig’s trotters, especially as food

Piacular — making or requiring atonement

Pilgarlic — a bald-headed man, or a person regarded with mild contempt

Pinguid — resembling fat; oily or greasy

Piscatorial — connected with fishermen or fishing

Pleurodynia — severe pain in the muscles between the ribs or in the diaphragm

Plew — a beaver skin

Pneumonoul­tramicrosc­opicsilico­volcanocon­iosis — an invented term said to mean ‘a lung disease caused by inhaling very fine ash and sand
dust’, but rarely used except for its curiosity value

Pogey — Canadian informal unemployment or welfare benefit

Pollex — Anatomy the thumb

Pooter — a suction bottle for collecting insects and other small invertebrates

Portolan — a book containing sailing directions with hand-drawn charts and descriptions of harbors and coasts

Posology — the branch of medicine concerned with the size and frequency of doses of a medicine or a drug

Possident — a possessor, i.e. a person who owns something

Pother — a commotion or fuss

Pre-loved — second-hand

Presenteeism — the compulsion to spend longer at work than is required or to continue working despite illness

Previse — to foresee or predict an event

Probang — a strip of flexible material with a sponge or tuft at the end, used to remove a foreign body from the throat or to apply medication to it

Prosopagnosia — an inability to recognize the faces of familiar people, typically as a result of brain damage

Puddle jumper — A small, light aircraft which is fast and highly manoeuvrable and used for short trips

Puddysticks — children’s word very easy

Pyknic — a technical description of a stocky physique with a rounded body and head, thickset trunk, and a tendency to fat

Pyroclastic — relating to fragments of rock erupted by a volcano

Ragtop — a convertible car with a soft roof

Ratite — (of a bird such as the ostrich or emu) unable to fly because of having a flat breastbone, to which no flight muscles are attached

Rawky — foggy, damp, and cold

Razzia — a raid carried out by Moors in North Africa

Rebirthing — a form of therapy involving controlled breathing and intended to simulate the trauma of being born

Resurrection man — a person who, in past times, illicitly exhumed corpses from burial grounds and sold them to anatomists for dissection

Retiform — resembling a net

Rhinoplasty — plastic surgery performed on the nose

Rubiginous — rust-coloured

Rubricate — to add elaborate capital letters (typically red ones) or other decorations to a manuscript

Rug rat — a child

Rumpot — a habitual or heavy drinker

Sangoma — a traditional healer or witch doctor in southern Africa

Sarmie — informal a sandwich

Saucier — a sauce chef

Saudade — a feeling of longing or melancholy that is supposedly characteristic of the Portuguese or Brazilian temperament

Scofflaw — a person who flouts the law

Screenager — a person in their teens or twenties who has an aptitude for using computers and the Internet

Scrippage — one’s baggage and personal belongings

Selkie — a mythical sea creature like a seal in water but human on land

Serac — a pinnacle or ridge of ice on the surface of a glacier

Sesquipedalian — (of a word) having many syllables or (of a piece of writing) using many long words

Shallop — a light sailing boat used chiefly for coastal fishing

Shamal — a hot, dry north-westerly wind that blows across the Persian Gulf in summer and causes sandstorms

Shavetail — US military slang a newly commissioned officer, or any inexperienced person

Shippon — dialect a cattle shed

Shofar — a ram’s-horn trumpet used in Jewish religious ceremonies and, in ancient times, to sound a battle signal

Skanky — informal revolting

Skelf — a splinter or sliver of wood

Skimmington — a kind of procession once undertaken to make an example of a nagging wife or an unfaithful husband

Skycap — a porter at an airport

Snakebitten — informal unlucky or doomed to misfortune

Snollygoster — a shrewd or unprincipled person

Sockdolager — US informal a heavy blow

Solander — a protective box made in the form of a book, for holding items such as botanical specimens, maps, and colour plates

Soucouyant — a kind of witch, in eastern Caribbean folklore, who is believed to shed her skin by night and suck the blood of her victims

Soul case — the human body

Soul catcher — a hollowed bone tube used by a North American Indian medicine man to keep a sick person’s soul safe while they are sick

Spaghettification — the process by which (in some theories) an object would be stretched and ripped apart by gravitational forces on falling into a black hole

Spitchcock — an eel, split and then grilled or fried

Splanchnic — having to do with the the viscera or internal organs, especially those of the abdomen

Spurrier — a person who makes spurs

Stercoraceous — consisting of or resembling dung or faeces

Sternutator — something that causes sneezing

Stiction — the frictional force which hinders an object from being moved while in contact with another

Strappado — a punishment or torture in which the victim was hoisted in the air on a rope and then allowed to fall almost to the ground before being stopped with an abrupt jerk

Strigil — an instrument with a curved blade used by ancient Greeks and Romans to scrape sweat and dirt from the skin in a hot-air bath or after exercise

Struthious — having to do with or resembling an ostrich

Studmuffin — humorous a sexually attractive, muscular man

Stylite — a early Christian ascetic who lived standing on top of a pillar

Subfusc — the dark formal clothing worn for examinations and ceremonial or formal occasions at some universities

Submontane — passing under or through mountains, or situated on the lower slopes of a mountain range

Succuss — to shake something vigorously, especially a homeopathic remedy

Sudd — an area of floating vegetation that impedes navigation in a stretch of the White Nile

Suedehead — a youth like a skinhead but with slightly longer hair and smarter clothes

Sun-grazing — (of a comet) having an orbit which passes close to the sun

Superbious — proud and overbearing

Superette — a small supermarket

Taniwha — a mythical monster which, according to Maori legend, lives in very deep water

Tappen — the plug by which the rectum of a bear is closed during hibernation

Tellurian — of or inhabiting the earth, or an inhabitant of the earth

Testudo — a device used in siege warfare in ancient Rome, consisting of a wheeled screen with an arched roof (literally a ‘tortoise’)

Thalassic — relating to the sea

Thaumatrope — a scientific toy devised in the 19th century. It consisted of a disc with a different picture on each of its two sides: when the disc was rotated rapidly about a diameter, these pictures appeared to combine into one image.

Thirstland — a desert or large arid area

Thrutch — Na narrow gorge or ravine

Thurifer — a person carrying a censer, or thurible, of burning incense during religious ceremonies

Tiffin — chiefly Indian a light meal, especially lunch

Tigon — the hybrid off spring of a male tiger and a lioness (the offspring of a male lion and a tigress being a liger)

Tokoloshe — in African folklore, a mischievous and lascivious hairy water sprite

toplofty — informal haughty and arrogant

Transpicuous — transparent

Triskaidekaphobia — extreme superstition about the number thirteen

Triskelion — a Celtic symbol consisting of three radiating legs or curved lines, such as the emblem of the Isle of Man

Tsantsa — a human head shrunk as a war trophy by the Jivaro people of Ecuador

Turbary — the legal right to cut turf or peat for fuel on common ground or on another person’s ground

Ulu — a short-handled knife with a broad crescent-shaped blade, used by Inuit women

Umbriferous — shady

Uncinate — (of a part of the body) having a hooked shape

Uniped — a person or animal with only one foot or leg

Uroboros — a circular symbol depicting a snake (or a dragon) swallowing its tail, intended as an emblem of wholeness or infinity

Ustad — Indian an expert or highly skilled person, especially a musician

Vagarious — erratic and unpredictable in behavior or direction

Velleity — a wish or inclination which is not strong enough to lead one to take action

Verjuice — a sour juice obtained from crab apples or unripe grapes

Vicinal — neighbouring or adjacen

Vidiot — informal a habitual, undiscriminating watcher of television or videotapes

Vomitous — nauseating or repulsive

Wabbit — Scottish exhausted or slightly unwell

Waitron — a waiter or waitress

Wakeboarding — the sport of riding on a short, wide board while being towed behind a motor boat

Wayzgoose — an annual summer party and outing that used to be held by a printing house for all its employees

Winebibber — a heavy drinker

Wittol — a man who knows of and tolerates his wife’s infidelity

Woopie — an affluent retired person able to pursue an active lifestyle (from the initials of well-off older person)

Wowser — chiefly Austral./NZ a puritanical, prudish person or a killjoy

Xenology — the scientific study of extraterrestrial phenomena

Ylem — (in big bang theory) the primordial matter of the universe

Zetetic — proceeding by inquiry or investigation

Zoolatry — the worship of animals

Zopissa — a medicinal preparation made from wax and pitch scraped from the sides of ships

Zorro — a South American kind of fox

Zyrian — a former term for Komi, a language spoken in an area of Russia west of the Urals; at present the last entry in the Oxford English Dictionary TC mark

Source : https://thoughtcatalog.com/january-nelson/2018/06/unique-words/

This Mom Created A Controversial 'Juvenile Center' For Her Daughter To Curb Bad Behavior

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Disciplining your children is never easy. I’ve got two kids and my toddler has a penchant for tantrums. So giving him a time-out, or taking away his toys when he refuses to eat his food or not put on his clothes, or making him help clean up the mess he made  while he’s screaming and crying isn’t exactly my idea of a fun day.

However, I have noticed that it’s ultimately been for his benefit. He’s more respectful of other kids. He doesn’t act out when we’re at other people’s houses and when he does, usually a look from mom and dad is enough to stop him from pursuing any crumby behavior.

As human beings though, we’re impressionable. We’re going to get influenced by the people we hang out with, the movies we see, the stories we read, both the bad and the good. We just need to be lucky enough to identify when that behavior isn’t going to ultimately be healthy for us and for a lot of kids, understanding parents or other close family members and friends can help us see that.

Some children, however, might require a little extra attention to curb any bad habits they picked up and, depending on how intense their folks want to get in disciplining them, those corrective behavioral methods might be a bit unconventional.

Like when this Canadian mother decided to launch “Mommy’s Juvenile Detention Center” for her 9-year-old who wouldn’t stop, as she put it, “acting like an a**hole.”

The Newfoundland mom, Amanda Mitchell, stripped down her daughter’s room taking out all of her clothes, decor, games – pretty much anything fun.

She placed on her bed a set of clothes for the week: five pairs of underwear and socks, and a single outfit for her to wear each day.

Mitchell called the clothes “anti bullying clothing.”

So what spurred on the harsh punishment from the mom? As it turns out, her 9-year-old was not only bullying her best friend in school, but she was also cutting classes.

Mitchell posted a few photos of the stripped-down room along with a message about the drastic measures she took to ensure her daughter would stop her awful behavior.

“Welcome to Mommy’s Juvenile Detention little girl.

Harsh? Not in my opinion. If she grows up to break the law then the result is jail and that’s not what I want for my children. I think the problem with this generation is inadequate punishment. Punishment is bad, we should only use positive reinforcement and ignore all bad behavior – NOT in this house.”

The mom said that her daughter, upon seeing her room was shocked. In addition to her sparse surroundings, she was forced to rewrite the phrases, “I will not lie,” “I will be kind to everyone,” and “I am responsible for my own actions” 50 times each by hand.

The post received a bunch of mixed responses on line. All of the hullabaloo is what probably had Mitchell turn her post to private. There were many who supported the mom’s decision to discipline her daughter this way.

Others, however, believed the punishment was too harsh and even went as far to call Mitchell a “terrible parent.”

“Wow. I really feel that this is extreme … How old is your child? I feel that taking away toys, electronics etc. But making your child wear the same outfit to school for a week and stripping her entire room …overboard.”

After implementing the punishment, Mitchell noticed an immediate change in her daughter’s behavior: she responded in a positive way and seemed to see the seriousness of how her mean behavior was affecting others.

That, combined with some feedback from people online, caused Mitchell to relent on her punishment a bit. She reduced the number of lines that her daughter had to copy from 50 down to 25. Her daughter won’t be wearing the exact same outfit every day, either, but will cycle through our different anti-bullying shirts.

Mitchell’s daughter has already gotten some of her room’s amenities restored because of her positive behavior: some books, her side table, and lamp are back in her room.  So it’s more like grade four and less like cell block 4. 

Mitchell says that about 90% or so of parents who commented on her original post agreed with her behavior, with only a few people disagreeing with the way she disciplined her child.

What do you think of the punishment? Is it too harsh? Or a good way to curb crappy behavior before it gets out of hand?

Source : http://www.distractify.com/trending/2018/06/13/ZIDUOO/mommy-juvenile-detention-center